Decades before Gregor Mendel proposed the "Laws of Inheritance" -- or Charles Darwin
expounded upon the benefits of artificial selection -- a British farmer named Robert Bakewell
utilized an uncanny understanding of heredity and expertise in selective breeding to break
ground in the field of livestock improvement. One of Bakewell's greatest achievements was his
Dishley Leicester -- also known as the Leicester Longwool or English Leicester. This hardy,
large-framed sheep was widely used as a crossing sire to impart improved carcass and fleece
traits to the breeds of its time -- and would provide the foundation for many of the breeds in
existence today.
Influence of the
Leicester Longwool
In alphabetical order, these are the sheep breeds that were improved upon by the
Leicester Longwool
Apennine
Armenian
Semicoursewool
Beltex
Blue Texel
Bond
Borderdale
Brecknock Hill Cheviot
British Milk Sheep
Brown Headed Meat
Sheep
Cambridge
Charollais
Comeback
Cormo
Dala
Danish Landrace
Devon &
  Cornwall Longwool
Elliotdale
Fabrianese
Galway
German Blackheaded
Mutton
German Blueheaded Mutton
German Whiteheaded
Mutton
Greyface Dartmoor
INRA 401
Kemieniec
Leineschaf
LLanwenog
Lleyn
Oxford
Masham
Merinizzata Italiana
New Zealand Halfbred
North Country Cheviot
Panama
Perendale
Polish Merino
Polwarth
Polypay
Qinghai Semifinewool
Rideau Arcott
Roscommon
Rouge De L'Ouest
Roussin
Rygja
Scotch Mule
Scottish Greyface
Steigar
Swifter
Swiss White Alpine
Targhee
Tukidale
Welsh Mule
Wiltipoll
Yoroo
Yunnan Semifinewool
Zelazna
Bleu du Maine
Bluefaced Leicester
Border Leicester
Clun Forest
Columbia
Coopworth
Corriedale
Cotswold
CVM/Romeldale
Ile de France
Lincoln
Montadale
Romney
Shropshire
Teeswater
Texel
Wensleydale
White Suffolk
Lesser known - but also influenced by Leicester Longwool genetic
improvement are: